Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen
Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen

Gioia Alleria Amaranto Fountain Pen

Regular price $199.00 Sale price$159.20 Save $39.80
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The Gioia Pen Alleria is made in Italy, with a Neapolitan heart. Rediscover the sensations of putting your ideas, feelings and memories on paper. Let's go back to the essentials of writing with an instrument made with neapolitan knowledge and passion, and let's rediscover the joy of expression.

The pen is available with an EF, F, M or stub (1.1mm) nib and uses a piston filling mechanism.

Gioia Pen Italia was born in Naples from an idea of Mr. Fabio Cervasio. It is a collaboration of great master craftsmen with over 20 years of experience in the field of pen production. Already in 2014 the technical laboratory and the artisan workshop of Gioia started working on commissions for well-known Italian and international brands, to design, plan and produce wonderful writing instruments. Gioia Pen produces fountain pens, rollerballs, and ballpoint pens with strict quality controls. These pens are hand turned from bars of Italian resin, ebonite, celluloid and many other materials. And now Gioia Pen decides to put their pens to the attention of the whole world of beautiful writing.

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Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
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A.M.
Italian Pens, Expected Issues

Amongst the pen community (and other communities), Italian products have had a longstanding reputation for being very passionately designed and engineered, but not always being built to the highest standards. For starters, this is a hand mixed pen (the resins the pen is made from initially start as a liquid), so don't expect yours to look like the one in the image. Personally the one I received has far more of the lighter colored chatoyant resin and less of the darker colored resin. As a sidenote, I had initially thought (from looking the images here) that the pen was made out of one slightly translucent darker resin which had particles swirled into it strategically to get the effect we see on the images here, the actual case is that this pen consists of two separate resins mixed together, one lighter and one darker. The chatoyant resin is the lighter one of course, and is slightly translucent in bright light only (which I do enjoy). The darker resin is completely opaque. On my pen the resins are not as seamlessly mixed as they are on the pen in the image, and there are much more apparent borders between them, the colors are the same as they are in the advertising image however. That said, I think the pen I received is very tastefully done, just in a different manner than the one in the pictures here on Truphae. There are likely one or two Italians over in Florence hand mixing these resins, and I can see that they must like trying new things from time to time. So if you buy this pen, keep that in mind. As a final note on the design and construction, the good news is that the fit and finish is generally good. The surface finish on the resin and metal parts is a perfect mirror polish with no scratches, but the different sections of the pen which should be flush are at slightly different radii, for example on mine the finial is maybe 1/20 mm wider than the rest of the cap, and the rear section of the barrel used for the piston mechanism is perhaps that much different from the barrel of the pen, but in practice it's barely noticeable, so I'll give it a pass.

Alright, let's move on to the writing performance. This is where the Italian pen stereotypes rear their heads. Despite this Gioia having a German JoWo nib, there is more to how a pen writes than its nib. While the nib itself has no issues, it's not scratchy, the tines are not misaligned, etc; the way in which the nib was implemented into the rest of the writing mechanism had the pen constantly skipping, hard starting, and writing incredibly dry out of the box. I figured initially that maybe there had been some debris stuck in the nib from manufacturing, so I used the brass sheet method to clear out the nib channel. No dice, the pen still started skipping after about 2 sentences worth of writing. Alright fine, I thought, I should see if maybe there's something stuck in the feed. Luckily for the inexperienced, Gioia includes instructions for removing and replacing the nib in their manual that comes with the pen (thank you Gioia, I do appreciate that). After removing the nib and feed, inspecting both, finding no real errors, cleaning out the nib channel again for good measure, and reassembling the pen, still no dice. The pen still skips and hard starts. My theory is that the feed I got may have an abnormally small channel in it, so my next move (which I'm fairly confident will resolve the issue) is to first try enlarging the channel of the feed with a precision knife, and if that doesn't work, JoWo does sell replacement high-flow ebonite feeds which work with their #6 nibs. My point to the potential buyer of this pen is that they should be aware of the quality assurance process when it comes to a company selling a product. Diplomat and Gioia both use JoWo nibs, yet Diplomat pens always write perfectly and this Gioia has had a number of issues. The reason is that Gioia saves production costs by trusting that the nibs and feeds they buy will work whereas Diplomat likely rigorously checks every nib and feed they get, same deal for the Japanese brands, thus increasing cost. On the upshot, this is how Italian brands such as Gioia can offer such a high-end mixed-resin pen with a piston filler for such a relatively low price, given that even for 300 dollars you can't get an interesting looking Pilot or Sailor. You just have to be willing to put in some effort yourself.

In summary, this is a beautiful, clearly handmade pen at a very good price, but do be aware of the typical Italian pen manufacturer laissez-faire attitude when it comes to quality assurance. It is a necessary evil if we want pens such as this at the prices they are offered at, so if you buy this pen, buy it with the expectation of having to do some tuning yourself.

S
Susan
Great Pens, Friendly and Knowledgeable Store Owners

I took my husband to this store so he could pick out a good fountain pen for an early Father’s Day gift. The pens were gorgeous, and the owners are highly knowledgeable and friendly. These are low-pressure sales people, so you can buy a nice inexpensive pen, or splurge. My husband is the avid fountain pen collector, but after spending some time in the store, I started writing with a fountain pen. I now have a modest collection of my own. This is a gem of a store, in a central downtown location. You could make a whole afternoon out of visiting Truphae, and then going out for a lunch, or coffee, at one of the downtown cafes or coffee houses.

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